#arthistory: Mining Social Media to Historicize the Contemporary

Slides from my talk for the #arlis2015 panel “Creating New Worlds: The Digital Humanities and the Future of Art Research Methodologies

Abstract:

The ubiquity of image- and video- based social media platforms like InstaGram, Tumblr, and Vine give art history students an opportunity to engage dynamically with contemporary imagery in a live setting. This paper will describe how engaging critically with images in social media can provide valuable insights into audience response to contemporary and historical art, along with an ever-changing catalog of the contemporary gaze; as well as offering students exposure to concepts of metadata, text mining, information literacy, data visualization, and copyright and fair use.

I recorded the talk and will transcribe it later this week.

Digital Frontiers 2014

For the past three years I’ve had the honor to be the Director of Digital Frontiers, the best little digital humanities conference in Texas. The conference is truly interdisciplinary, bringing together scholars, students, librarians, archivists, and members of the community engaged with using digital resources for humanities research, teaching, and learning. My welcome address from DF2014 is here. If you’d like to see more, including Keynote addresses by Dorothea Salo and Miriam Posner, visit the UNT Digital Libraries Digital Frontiers Collection.

And watch the website – the CFP for DF2015 at UT-Dallas will be out in January!

 

Border Trouble: On the Frontiers of Digital Scholarship

My slides and the rough speaking text from my presentation at the Fourth Texas-Jalisco Conference in Education and Culture, March 22 at the University of North Texas. This talk was part of a panel, “New Frontiers for Research, Teaching and Learning: Digital Scholarship and Latin@ Archives/Nuevas Fuentes para Investigación, Enseñanza and Aprendizaje: Estudios Digitales y Archivos Latin@s.”

How Soon is Now?: Being Human in the Digital Humanities

I had the privilege of participating in the Austin College Digital Humanities Colloquium this week.  My talk, “How Soon is Now?: Being Human in the Digital Humanities” presented three case studies for integrating data (i.e. textual evidence) and free DH tools into undergrad teaching.  I borrowed heavily from the idiom of Tumblr to lend a little humor to the talk, and have linked the Tumblr sites I reference below.

My slides from the talk are here:

Resources:

Google N-Gram Viewer
Tagxedo
Voyant Tools

Tumblrs:

Academic Tim Gunn

office hours are over

Manatee University Strategic Planning

Grumpy Cat

Nuevas Fuentes para Investigación, Enseñanza and Aprendizaje: Estudios Digitales y Archivos Latin@s

Excited to be included on a panel on digital scholarship and Latin@ archives for the IV Jalisco Texas Conference in education and culture coming up on March 22 at UNT.

New Frontiers for Research, Teaching and Learning: Digital Scholarship and Latin@ Archives
Nuevas Fuentes para Investigación, Enseñanza and Aprendizaje: Estudios Digitales y Archivos Latin@s Continue reading “Nuevas Fuentes para Investigación, Enseñanza and Aprendizaje: Estudios Digitales y Archivos Latin@s”

Disciplining Interdisciplinarity

We threw a little conference here at UNT last week. Digital Frontiers was a one-day conference followed by a THATCamp that was intended to bring together “the diverse communities who use digital resources for research, teaching, and learning.” The schedule featured university archivists; grad students from History, LIS, Media, and English; faculty in English and History; digital librarians; and library administrators. In short, it was supposed to model the ideals of interdisciplinarity and cross-disciplinary dialogue and collaboration that is touted as the future of the academy. On the surface it was quite successful. It was well attended, the THATCampers worked very hard and cheefully through a long day, and the Twitter back channel was active and overwhelmingly positive.

But a couple of things emerged for me as flies in the happy ointment. Continue reading “Disciplining Interdisciplinarity”

The Vanity of Systems: Data Management for Humanists

Last week at the c19 conference in Berkeley, I had the pleasure of sitting on the “Digits, Data, and Dilemmas” panel with some very distinguished folks from the Digital Humanities world. My remarks, “The Vanity of Systems: Data Management for Humanists,” are below:

Unless you’re a librarian or scientist, you probably neither know nor care that last fall the National Science Foundation mandated that all grant applications must include a 2-page plan for the retention and sharing research data. This has caused a significant kerfuffle in the scientific research communities tasked with making and implementing these plans, and in the library community tasked with helping academic researchers follow through on what they promise the NSF. Continue reading “The Vanity of Systems: Data Management for Humanists”

CFP for Roundtable on Data Management for Humanities Research at MLA 2013

In collaboration with my friend and colleague Korey Jackson at University of Michigan, I put out a CFP for a panel on Issues in Data Management for Humanities Research for the 2013 MLA in Boston.

Since the MLA site only allows eeensy-teeensy little abstracts (check ours out here), we decided to elaborate a bit. And please note that it’s not “for Digital Humanities Research.” We’re thinking about data broadly in the Humanities, and wondering what exactly that might mean.

MLA Call for Papers: Issues in Data Management for Humanities Research Continue reading “CFP for Roundtable on Data Management for Humanities Research at MLA 2013”