Border Trouble: On the Frontiers of Digital Scholarship

My slides and the rough speaking text from my presentation at the Fourth Texas-Jalisco Conference in Education and Culture, March 22 at the University of North Texas. This talk was part of a panel, “New Frontiers for Research, Teaching and Learning: Digital Scholarship and Latin@ Archives/Nuevas Fuentes para Investigación, Enseñanza and Aprendizaje: Estudios Digitales y Archivos Latin@s.”

How Soon is Now?: Being Human in the Digital Humanities

I had the privilege of participating in the Austin College Digital Humanities Colloquium this week.  My talk, “How Soon is Now?: Being Human in the Digital Humanities” presented three case studies for integrating data (i.e. textual evidence) and free DH tools into undergrad teaching.  I borrowed heavily from the idiom of Tumblr to lend a little humor to the talk, and have linked the Tumblr sites I reference below.

My slides from the talk are here:

Resources:

Google N-Gram Viewer
Tagxedo
Voyant Tools

Tumblrs:

Academic Tim Gunn

office hours are over

Manatee University Strategic Planning

Grumpy Cat

Nuevas Fuentes para Investigación, Enseñanza and Aprendizaje: Estudios Digitales y Archivos Latin@s

Excited to be included on a panel on digital scholarship and Latin@ archives for the IV Jalisco Texas Conference in education and culture coming up on March 22 at UNT.

New Frontiers for Research, Teaching and Learning: Digital Scholarship and Latin@ Archives
Nuevas Fuentes para Investigación, Enseñanza and Aprendizaje: Estudios Digitales y Archivos Latin@s Continue reading “Nuevas Fuentes para Investigación, Enseñanza and Aprendizaje: Estudios Digitales y Archivos Latin@s”

Librarians in pop culture

Working in a library has me thinking about my favorite librarians in pop culture. Interestingly, they’re mostly women, which is true of the profession at large, though that’s changing slowly.

Here’s a sampling of my best loved librarians, and library-centered stories, music, and films:

1. Parker Posey as Mary in Party Girl

Continue reading “Librarians in pop culture”

Disciplining Interdisciplinarity

We threw a little conference here at UNT last week. Digital Frontiers was a one-day conference followed by a THATCamp that was intended to bring together “the diverse communities who use digital resources for research, teaching, and learning.” The schedule featured university archivists; grad students from History, LIS, Media, and English; faculty in English and History; digital librarians; and library administrators. In short, it was supposed to model the ideals of interdisciplinarity and cross-disciplinary dialogue and collaboration that is touted as the future of the academy. On the surface it was quite successful. It was well attended, the THATCampers worked very hard and cheefully through a long day, and the Twitter back channel was active and overwhelmingly positive.

But a couple of things emerged for me as flies in the happy ointment. Continue reading “Disciplining Interdisciplinarity”

New CLIR Report: The Problem of Data

The Problem of DataSome of my recent research is featured in a new Council on Library & Information Resources (CLIR) report, The Problem of Data. The two-part report features an anthropological study of data curation professionals conducted by my colleagues Andrew Asher (Bucknell) and Lori Jahnke (Emory).

My portion of the report is a snapshot of data curation education as it exists in the LIS field:

Spencer D. C. Keralis, director of the Digital Scholarship Co-Operative at the University of North Texas and former CLIR postdoctoral fellow, provides a snapshot of the current state of data curation education. He finds that while LIS and iSchool programs are making efforts to develop data curation curricula “much work still needs to be done to prepare LIS graduates for roles as data professionals in and out of libraries.” He adds that “the LIS world largely remains a closed circuit, providing concentrations within tracks restricted to LIS enrollees.” Keralis notes that the trend in emerging curriculum development programs is to open up this closed circuit and allow post-baccalaureate students and professionals to take courses in data curation.

I hope the report generates some conversation about this important trans-disciplinary practice in and out of LIS programs.

You can find more information and download the report here.